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Dr. Terry Miller is Guest Speaker July 11                         July 1, 2013

 

 

TMiller OH-Otway Bridge2

 

   Terry E. Miller, Ph.D., author of The Covered Bridges of Tuscarawas County, was born in Dover, Ohio, and began visiting covered bridges with his father, Max T. Miller, in 1953.  Since then, he has visited and photographed more than 1000 covered bridges in the United States, Canada, Europe, and China. 

 

    In his book, Miller details the history behind the building of more than eighty covered bridges in Tuscarawas County from 1829-1939.  By 1947, none of those bridges had survived.

 

   As a teenager, Miller made careful measurements of all bridges he visited, built scale models, and researched the bridges of two Ohio counties (Tuscarawas and Coshocton) from dusty, hand-written journals.  In addition to his hobby, he spent a 30-year career teaching Ethnomusicology at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio before retiring in 2005. 

 

    His new book, America’s Covered Bridges, co-authored with Ronald G. Knapp, is being published by Tuttle this fall (272 pp; 550 images; 100,000 words; large format).

 

    Dr. Miller will be guest speaker at the upcoming monthly members’ meeting of The Heritage Home Association of Tuscarawas County.  He will be introduced by his brother Jeff Miller, who is Heritage Home Association president and CEO of Miller Studio, Inc. of New Philadelphia.

 

   The meeting will be held at Geib Center, Dover, on North Wooster Avenue and will be open to the public with free admission.  Light snacks and refreshments will be served.  No ticket or reservation is required -- 7:00PM on Thursday July 11, 2013.

Garver House Earns Plaque, Heroes Accept Awards     May 22, 2013

 

The Heritage Home Association of Tuscarawas County presented awards to 11 Heroes of Preservation on Tuesday evening. The association also presented a 20th Century Heritage Home Plaque, its first plaque presentation of 2013.

 

HisrichHillsHouseBB

The following Heroes of Preservation have gone above and beyond the call of duty to restore and/or preserve historic structures within Tuscarawas County: 

1) Gary & Sue Bell for their residence on Rt 250 in Dennison;

2) Scott Fisher for the Knights of Pythias Hall in Bolivar;

3) Jon & Cindy Elsasser for restoration of Canal Tavern of Zoar;

4) Mayor Clayton Weller on behalf of the village of Sugarcreek for the World’s Largest Cuckoo Clock;


5) James & Cathy Marker for restoration of Brick House on Main B&B in Gna
529MainStGnadenhutten-2Cdenhutten (below right);

6) Doug McGlumphy & Jennifer Greer for Hisrich Hills B&B in Stonecreek (above left);

7) Joseph & JoAnn Bower for restoration of Mt. Pleasant Pottery – the brick  school house – in Strasburg;           


8) Loretta Couts on behalf of Port Washington Historical Society for the old Union Hall;


9) Newcomerstown Historical Society for Temperance Tavern Museum;

10) Greg DiDonato for restoration of The Trainmaster Inn in Dennison;

and 11) William Weisgarber for preservation of The Tuscarawas Insurance Agency building in New Philadelphia.

 

 

GarverHouse-14Accepting a 20th Century Heritage Home Plaque for Garver House in Strasburg was owner Al Cline.  Garver House was converted into a Bed & Breakfast by its previous owner.

 

The 20th Century Plaque may be awarded for architecturally or historically significant homes and other structures of Tuscarawas County built between 1901 and 1925. The home must have its original architectural lines, facade still intact, and generally be in good condition. Upon submission of a plaque application, a review process ensues during which the property is inspected and scored by a committee appointed by the association.

 

Garver House is a 2 1/2 story Colonial Revival house built between 1902-1904 for Gustave A. & Viola Garver.  G.A. & Rudolph Garver were the founders of the Garver Bros. store. 

 

The home has 14 rooms, 4 fireplaces, original oak floors with inlaid designs, and its original entrance door with beveled glass sidelights is still in place.

 

The house remained in the Garver family for over 100 years.  G.A. Garver’s son John Sr. & wife Grace began their occupancy of the home in 1956.  Upon the death of Grace in 2002, ownership passed to their son John Jr.  The Owens family then purchased the house in 2005 and sold it to its current owners, Alvin & Natalie Cline, in 2010.

 

To date, 65 Tuscarawas County historic homes and buildings have been awarded Heritage Home Plaques, 20th Century Plaques, or Historic Markers, including the county courthouse in New Philadelphia and Dover’s historic Reeves Victorian Mansion.

 

A  non-profit (501c3) Ohio corporation founded in 1976, the Association is dedicated to the preservation and documentation of the architecturally and historically significant homes and buildings of Tuscarawas County. The Association endeavors to cultivate appreciation of this part of our local heritage, to develop awareness of and encourage interest in preserving historic structures within the community, and to educate those who are interested in preservation or are actively involved in the restoration of historically significant structures.

 

 

Windows:  Replace? Or Repair? That is the question.

 

   (reprinted from Heritage Ohio eNews - April 22, 2013)

 

 

Now that spring is here, and we are flinging open our windows, let's review the importance of historic windows.

Saving Windows, Saving Money is the Report from the NTHP Green Lab which offers insight for homeowners weighing the financial and energy tradeoffs between replacing or repairing older, less efficient windows. Read HERE

National Trust's Repair or Replace: A Visual Look at the Impacts: Read HERE

    The Kansas SHPO (state historic preservation office) did a series of you tube videos on window repair: reglazing, sash cord, and epoxy use: Watch HERE

    Preservation Virginia also has a you tube channel with several useful videos on rebuilding windows:
Watch HERE

 

Sometimes windows are too far gone and cannot be repaired.  What then?  Stay tuned for info on the next Olde House Parts garage sale!

Bimeler Museum Restoration Moving Forward

August 16, 2012

 

Pictured in front of the Bimeler Museum in Historic Zoar, Ohio, L-R: Historic Zoar Site Director Jennifer Donato, Sharon Feemster, Plant Sale Chairperson Edee Kirkendall, HHA president Tom Strickling, Lee Bechtol, Allison Bechtol, OHS Director of Historic Sites George Kane, Tod Carper, Carl Mackey   Members of the Heritage Home Association of Tuscarawas County, Zoar Community Association, and Director of  Historic Sites for the Ohio Historical Society, George Kane, met in Zoar on Thursday and discussed what’s in store for the Bimeler House, built in 1868, which is currently closed to the public due to catastrophic flood damage incurred in 2005 and 2008.

 

   As you drive by the house, on Third Street in Zoar, you’ll probably notice some peeling paint.  If you drive slower, you might notice some pretty ominous-looking cracks in the building’s brick façade.  If you stop, you’ll notice the building is sagging and leaning. Foundation damage is visible from the exterior of the house.  Inside, it looks much worse.  In addition, heating and electrical systems were destroyed.  Just to begin foundation repairs, the 144-yr old brick house must be raised above it.  Not a simple task. Black mold remediation will be a part of the project, as well.

 

   In May, Heritage Home Association members and friends held a benefit plant sale at the historic Sewing House in Zoar with the intent of raising funds toward the restoration of the museum. More than 800 plants were sold in one day, along with assorted hand-painted clay pots. Additional plants were sold in the days and weeks following the sale.  Hand-painted clay pots are now available in the Zoar Store.

 BimelerMuseumPresentlyClosed2012

   Current estimates for restoration of the historic Bimeler House top $700,000.  On Thursday, before the Zoar Community Association Board of Trustees meeting, Edee Kirkendall, event chairperson, HHA President Tom Strickling, and other HHA members presented a check to George Kane, Director of Historic Sites and Facilities for the Ohio Historical Society, earmarked for restoration of the Bimeler Museum.

 

   After hearing comments that the $2500 donated was a drop in the bucket in comparison to the huge cost of the multi-faceted task at hand, Kane commented, “Yes, we need LOTS of drops, and every last one of them is very much appreciated.”

 

   Zoar Village was founded in 1817 by a group of about 200 German Separatists, who sought to escape from religious persecution in their homeland.  Today, Zoar is a community of about 75 families living in the original homes built during the community’s earliest days in 1817 to present. Many of the original homes have been preserved and/or restored, as have the many buildings and museums   --  and the majority were damaged by the same floods that threatened the existence of the Bimeler House.  The community is now under the supervision of Ohio Historical Society.


   The State Controlling Board recently released $396,859 to put a new basement under the historic Bimeler House Museum. Read more about it here: http://www.timesreporter.com/newsnow/x465795569/Zoar-Bimeler-House-restoration-in-home-stretch

 

   The Heritage Home Association of Tuscarawas County is a non-profit Ohio corporation dedicated to the preservation and documentation of the architecturally and historically significant homes and buildings of Tuscarawas County.  The Association endeavors to develop and encourage interest within the community in preserving these historic structures, to cultivate appreciation of this part of our local heritage, and to educate individuals interested in preserving or restoring local homes and other buildings. The Association is tax exempt under IRC Section 501(c)(3).

 

   Visit Heritage Home Association on the web at http://www.tuschha.org.  Visit Zoar Community Association at http://www.historiczoarvillage.com.  Visit Ohio Historical Society at http://www.ohiohistory.org.

Zoar added to list of endangered historic sites

By Lisa Cornwell. The Associated Press | Jun 06, 2012

(as published  by The Times Reporter at http://www.timesreporter.com)

CINCINNATI — An historic-place listing announced Wednesday for an eastern Ohio village threatened by flooding, and potentially by flood control efforts, is seen by some as a major step toward saving the nearly 200-year-old community.

SaveHistoricZoarThe National Trust for Historic Preservation said that Zoar has been named to its 2012 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. The annual list spotlights architectural, cultural and natural heritage sites at risk of destruction or irreparable damage and raises awareness about the threats.

The list has been so successful in boosting preservation efforts that only a handful of the 233 sites listed since 1988 have been lost, according to trust officials. “Working closely with the U.S. Corps of Engineers, we believe a solution can be found that spares this one-of-a-kind village from catastrophic flooding or demolition,” Stephanie Meeks, the national trust’s president, said.

The village, founded in 1817 by German religious dissenters seeking religious freedom, has been protected by a 75-year-old levee from water that backs up behind the Tuscarawas River’s Dover Dam.

Flood waters over the years have led to water seepage under the earthen structure that stretches along the edges of Zoar and the levee is deteriorating. The Corps of Engineers, which has classified the levee as in need of urgent repairs, has taken temporary protective measures and is working on a study to determine a permanent solution by 2015.

The corps says it’s too soon to talk about options, but village residents say possible scenarios discussed include federal officials fixing the levee or buying the buildings to either move them to higher ground or to level them and remove the levee. Zoar supporters want the levee repaired and say the new designation should provide more national support for saving the village. “This listing confirms Zoar’s historical significance nationally, not just locally,” said Jon Elsasser, president of the Zoar Community Association and a member of the Ohio Historical Society’s Board of Trustees. “This recognition is what we have been looking for.” Elsasser said the new listing doesn’t assure Zoar’s survival but “has a pretty good track record for helping preserve sites.”

The endangered listing doesn’t hinder the corps’ efforts to find a permanent solution to the levee problem, said study manager Aaron Smith. “We already knew the village’s historical significance, and that definitely will be an evaluation factor,” said Smith.

The village once provided communal housing for 500 Society of Separatists of Zoar members who pooled their resources earned through small industries, textile work, crafts and agriculture. The society disbanded in 1898, but the village survived and now has about 170 residents. It has retained many of its original structures, including about 50 brick, log and frame buildings, some of which have been restored and are open for tours.

Elsasser said he is confident that the endangered designation will prompt people around the country to contact the corps and other federal officials “to let them know just how important it is to save Zoar.”

Heritage Home Association Officers Set for 2012

 

The Heritage Home Association of Tuscarawas County held its annual meeting and banquet Thursday evening, January 5th, at the historic Reeves Museum Carriage House in Dover. It was a celebration of a successful year, which included the organization’s first annual Plant Sale, its second THAT Old House preservation and restoration workshop for do-it-yourselfers, and the 18th annual Christmas Tour of Homes.

 

After a recap of the events of 2011 and announcements of upcoming events, officers were elected and the member of the year was announced.

 

Among events planned for this year are the first Olde House Parts garage sale -- Saturday, March 31, featuring items from the former Olde House Parts architectural salvage shop; the 2nd Annual Plant Sale on Saturday, May 19, which will be staged as a joint effort in Zoar with the Zoar Community Association in continuing support of restoration of the historic Bimeler Museum;  a Garden Tour on Saturday, July 14, and the 19th Annual Christmas Tour of Homes on Sunday, December 9. 

 

The board of directors for 2012 will consist of:  President Tom Strickling of New Philadelphia, Vice-President Jeff Miller of Dover, Secretary Leslie Wilson of New Philadelphia, Treasurer Rod Kirkendall of Fairfield Township, Plaquing V.P. Jerry Stoughton of New Philadelphia, Public Relations V.P. Patti Strickling of New Philadelphia, Membership V.P. Tod Carper of Dover, Projects V.P. George Laurence of New Philadelphia, Social Activities V.P. Liz Hipp of New Philadelphia, and Program V.P. Marlena Allen of New Philadelphia.

 

Outgoing president Rod Kirkendall was named member of the year.

 

HHA-Member of the Year-2012

 Pictured: Tod Carper (right) presents
HHA’s Member of the Year award to
outgoing president Rod Kirkendall.

Heritage Home Association Hosts 18th Annual Christmas Tour

 

The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association will once again sponsor their festive Christmas Tour of Homes on the second weekend of December, Sunday, December 11, 2011, from 12 noon to 5 pm. This event has become a holiday tradition with many people both in and out of our area. Visitors will be inspired for the holiday season and take with them memories of Christmases to come and Christmases past as they view these beautiful homes in their holiday finest.

 

The nine homes selected for this year’s tour date from 1830 to the present. The sites include elegant, beautiful, historic, and unusual homes to tour. In this drive-it-yourself tour, the properties will be trimmed with glimmering lights, greenery, and holiday décor which are sure to give pleasure and enjoyment.

 

One special church is included for this year’s tour. The Sharon Moravian Church, just outside of the town of Tuscarawas, will be decorated to welcome guests and, as a special bonus, they will present their fabulous Putz. The Putz shows a depiction of the story of the birth of Christ in miniature through lights and story. If you have never seen this story it is well worth the time. Showings will be every half hour throughout the day of the tour.

 

 

 

The historic Richard Burrell House, at 2740 N. Wooster Ave., Dover was built circa 1830 and exemplifies the then popular Classical or Greek Revival style. This stately brick structure is located on the remnant of the once 158 acre Burrell Farm. (Today this home sits next to the Dover National Guard Armory). Craftsmen using old growth native white oak trees felled on the farm and bricks made at the home site made a sturdy home. Almost all of the woodwork, windows, floors and plaster are original to 1830. The current owners, Jeff and Susan Miller, did a three year restoration starting in 2006 and Jeff made many of the replacement parts that were handcrafted exactly as the originals. The ground floor once contained five fireplaces of which only two remain. This magnificent home will take you back to an era of long ago. This is a Plaqued Heritage Home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next home on the tour, at 530 North Wooster Ave., Dover, is a grand pre-Civil War home, built in 1855 and it has been in the Hardesty family since 1879 when it was purchased by Alonzo and Mary Baker Hardesty. Alonzo and his brother William were known as the Hardesty Brothers, proprietors of Hardesty Flour Mills in Canal Dover. That mill was the third largest milling establishment in the United States. The house remains largely as it was at the turn of the century. The first floor, with 11 foot ceilings, features a center hall with lovely open stairway, living room and large parlor, each having a fireplace, and a formal dining room. The upstairs features a large center hall, four bedrooms, bathroom and maid’s quarters accessible to the kitchen by a back stairway. This home is currently in the process of being lovingly restored by Allison and Lee Bechtol. Allison is a great-granddaughter of the Hardesty family.

 

The home of James, Kimberly, and Alexandra Gray at 940 4th St. NW, New Philadelphia, is a lovely brick Neo-Federal style home that has been part of New Philadelphia’s Fourth Street landscape since 1926. Outstanding exterior features are the beautiful front door and side porch with double French door access and a second floor balcony. As you enter through the front foyer you will notice the home’s original walnut woodwork. The main floor of the home is decorated in frosted red roses and a 2nd floor bedroom was designed by 9 year old Alexandra and features her current love for Monster High.

 

The next home is just over a block away, at 1039 4th St., New Philadelphia. This fairytale cottage-style home, built in 1927, is owned by Ed and Linda Harper. “It has a cozy charm that I felt the moment I walked inside,” states Linda. After many hours of work, Linda says, the house is “coming back into its own”, and hopefully it looks more like the house that Jon and May Pyle moved into in 1927. The Harpers purchased the home in 2006 and have been working on it ever since. Linda loves decorating and she and her husband enjoy dressing up their home for the holidays. In the den Linda has recreated her past with decorations and toys from her childhood.

 

My Fair Lady, at 552 Fair Ave., NW, New Philadelphia, is an impressive 1870’s Queen Anne home owned by Sharon and Randy Feemster. This stately brick home has enjoyed a rebirth of Holiday Festivities since the Feemsters first bought the home in 1996. As lovers of Victorian and Edwardian antiques and collectibles, they hope you also will enjoy the many rooms with their various holiday themes. Known by many in town, as the Halloween house, the Feemsters are happy to enjoy the different holidays and seasons with the community they live in and love so dearly. This is a Plaqued Heritage Home.

 

John and Linda Welfley searched several years for an open concept home. In 2004 they decided to take on the monumental task of converting a 1930’s era post and beam barn at 2960 Boltz Rd., SE, New Philadelphia into their home. John enjoyed working full time on the structure himself, with some help from close friends and family. The Welfleys were able to move into their spacious home after two years of hard work. Linda loves decorating for Christmas. Her trees include the themes of snowmen, patriotism, birds, the Salvation army, and a special silver & red tree which is twelve feet tall. Linda also likes decorating with old trunks, wagons, and Raggedy Ann & Andy. John also has his touches throughout this home and one in particular is his climbing wall--inside the house. This is a very interesting and unusual home that you are sure to enjoy.

 

Just a few houses past the Welfley home is the next site at 3042 Boltz Rd. SE, New Philadelphia. This historic two-story brick Italianate home, owned by Donna Vacca, was the original Boltz Family Farmstead which was built in 1856. According to a Boltz family member, Mrs. Boltz had a restaurant called the River Biscuit Inn close by on Route 416. With this restaurant she was able to successfully send two of her sons to college. The home is currently being renovated by Donna’s son Edward Vacca Jr., who has done all of the work himself. This beautiful historic home has five fireplaces, three of which were discovered during the renovation. Future plans include opening the home as a tea room which will be called Antoinette’s Tea House after her mother. Take a step back into time as you wander through this lovely home.

 

The Sharon Moravian Church, located at 4776 Moravian Church Rd., SE, New Philadelphia is about ½ mile from the Vacca home. This church was organized by settlers from the Bethlehem, Pennsylvania area in 1815 and has been a presence in the community since then. The first Sharon church building was erected and dedicated in 1817. This was replaced by a larger facility made of bricks manufactured near the site in 1857. The Sharon congregation supports the missions of the worldwide denomination as well as local service projects. We are a denomination known for our love of music, especially the brass, and the miniature depiction of the birth of Christ known as a Putz. Our Putz, with numerous carved figures from a noted German sculptor, will be shown on the tour for all to enjoy. The Putz showings are every ½ hour- this is a very special display, it will take about 20 minutes, and you don’t want to miss it!

 

Our next home on the tour is at 5749 Greer Drive, SE, Uhrichsville and belongs to Derrick and Lauren Castello. This quaint, country-style ranch was built in 1985 by the Greer family and was purchased in 2008 by the current owners. Set on a beautiful country lot with approximately two acres, the home boasts an open concept family area and kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and a lower-level family room. Primitive Christmas décor is displayed throughout the main level of the home with many Christmas trees, snowmen, and Santas. The home’s lower-level displays the owner’s love for the Ohio State Buckeyes with a festive touch.

 

The last stop is a beautiful Victorian home at 804 North Water St., Uhrichsville, built around 1915, was purchased by John and Kelly Chapman in 1994. After a complete restoration, the home boasts 10 foot tall ceilings, original oak hardwood floors and oak wood trim throughout the house. For the holiday Christmas season, the home is lavishly decorated with fourteen Christmas trees. Each tree is tastefully decorated with a different theme to showcase the treasured memories of the family. Also on display also is their collection of Santa Clauses, both in portrait and large figurines, along with their large nutcrackers. You are invited to step back in time as you enter their beautifully decorated Victorian home.

 

The homes may be visited in any order. Tickets are $10.00 presale at the Geib Funeral Homes of both Dover and New Philadelphia and the First National Bank--at the Dennison office only. (Tickets on Saturday, Dec. 10 will only be on sale at the New Philadelphia Geib office). Tickets on the day of the tour will be $15.00 at the doors of any of the sites. The tour is not recommended for small children. Everyone must have a ticket to enter.

 

There is some walking involved and we encourage the visitors to start early on the tour if they intend to see all the sites:

 

1. The Jeff and Susan Miller Home

2740 N. Wooster Ave., Dover, Ohio

2. The Hardesty House

530 North Wooster Avenue, Dover, Ohio

3. Home of James, Kimberly, and Alexandra Gray

940 4th Street NW, New Philadelphia, Ohio

4. Home of Ed and Linda Harper

1039 4th Street NW, New Philadelphia, Ohio

5. My Fair Lady- Home of Randy and Sharon Feemster

552 Fair Ave. NW, New Philadelphia, Ohio

6. Home of John and Linda Welfley

2960 Boltz Rd. SE, New Philadelphia, Ohio

7. Home of Donna Vacca

3042 Boltz Rd. SE, New Philadelphia, Ohio

8. The Sharon Moravian Church

4776 Moravian Church Rd. SE, New Philadelphia, Ohio

9. Home of Derrick and Lauren Castello

5749 Greer Drive SE, Uhrichsville, Ohio

10. Home of John and Kelly Chapman

804 North Water St., Uhrichsville, Ohio

 

For more information about the tour or about purchasing tickets, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Ahhhh… Home, Crap, Home!


“All right, that's it! I've had it with you!  I’ve had it with the house -- and Max, and the orchestra and EVERYTHING! How long will it take to put this house together?!”  (Anna Crowley, The Money Pit, 1986)

Strickling-Laurence_THATOldHouseWEB

 
 
Tom Strickling (left) and George Laurence (right),
both of New Philadelphia, have successfully tackled
most of the challenges a homeowner might be confronted
with when attempting to whip an OLD house into shape. 
Their session on window and door repair was a top
vote-getter at the 2009 rendition of THAT Old House,
the restoration workshop for do-it-yourselfers.
 

If you’ve ever tried to fix things around your own house, successful or not, you know how frustrating it can be – especially when it’s an old house, a VERY old house that needs more tender loving care than you could have ever imagined.  You also have gotten a taste of how expensive it can be to hire the work done by someone else.

You are not alone.

Those who have persevered the many struggles that come with restoring an old house, a historic house, know that the process can make you laugh, make you cry, make you want to take a wrecking ball to it rather than the more delicate tools required to complete the project at hand.

Tom Strickling and George Laurence will do their best to lighten your burden a bit on Saturday, April 9, from 8am to 5pm in The Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts, New Philadelphia.  Strickling is Industrial Arts Technology Instructor at Garaway High School in Sugarcreek.  Laurence owns Museum Acrylics, a New Philadelphia company that produces custom acrylic display boxes for museums, businesses, and individuals all over the country.  Both have had more than their fair share of experiences in tackling the tough problems of home restoration and maintenance.  Both serve as directors for The Heritage Home Association of Tuscarawas County.

Their topic for instruction at this restoration workshop, will be wall and ceiling repair.  Got a wet wall?  A cracked ceiling? Worse? Original plaster and lath can be a challenging prospect.  Or did somebody punch a hole in your drywall?  This dynamic duo has seen it, dealt with it.  They know the techniques, materials, and the tricks of the trade, and they will share that knowledge and experience with workshop participants.

Gary Howes of Durable Restoration (Columbus, OH) will offer instruction on masonry and mortar repair,  and other workshop sessions will include work with interior coatings and surface preparation by Jim Kopras of Sherwin Williams. Jeff Miller and Carl Mackey will be making their first THAT Old House appearance, offering guidance on various types of flooring repairs.  Jeff comes to class with 30+ years as a cabinet maker and woodworker, while Carl, through his company Mission Possible, creates custom furniture and is experienced in most phases of finish carpentry.  If you've seen their work, you know their class will be a real treat.

Covington_Hands-OnMortarIntruction2009WEB
 
 
 
Dave Covington of Durable Restoration
offers one-on-one coaching to a workshop
participant at THAT Olde House, the
restoration workshop for do-it-yourselfers.
His workshop session with Gary Howes at
THAT Old House 2009 was the top-rated class.

Join others with similar interests and concerns for this one-of-a- kind opportunity.  You have a dilemma? The probability is high that you’ll find answers in one of the sessions at THAT Old House.

Kopras-SHW_PaintInstruction2009WEB
 
Jim Kopras, Sherwin Williams manager and paint consultant extraordinaire
offers instruction and tips on surface preparation and coatings at
THAT Old
House, the restoration workshop for do-it-yourselfers.
 
 

Advance registration is $25 ($35 at the door) and covers participation in all sessions, as well as all workshop materials.  Workshop participants will also receive a voucher good for 15% off at Olde House Parts, the architectural salvage shop.

 

THAT Old House is presented by The Heritage Home Association of Tuscarawas County, a non-profit Ohio corporation. President Rod Kirkendall said, “This is one of the ways we try to encourage preservation, by offering ways for people to learn about it.  This is not a fund-raiser.  Eliminating some of the frustration associated with home repairs and restoration through education can go a long way toward maintaining the character and charm of a home, a neighborhood, an entire town or county – as well as the sanity of the homeowner.”

 

For more information, or to request a registration brochure, visit http://www.tuschha.org/events/workshops or call 330-339-4551.  Got a question?  Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Did you guess where this article’s title came from?  It was Walter Fielding, upon arriving home, in The Money Pit.

 

HHA Names Members of the Year January 7, 2011


   Members of The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association elected officers and directors for 2011 at their Annual Meeting held at the Reeves Carriage House in Dover on Thursday evening.

    Elected were Rod Kirkendall (president), Tom Strickling (vice-president), Leslie Wilson (secretary), Liz Hipp (treasurer), Patti Strickling (public relations), Jerry Stoughton (plaquing), Marlena Allen (programs), Jeff Miller (social activities), Tod Carper (membership), and George Laurence (projects).

 

    In recapping the Association’s year, Kirkendall said, “What a year! In terms of new plaque recipients, we took a breather, as we only awarded one Heritage Home Plaque in 2010, compared with a total of eight plaques (Heritage Home, Historic Marker, and 20th Century Plaque) the previous year, but… as a result of the efforts of a handful of dedicated members, we opened the area’s only architectural salvage shop, Olde House Parts (123 W 3rd St, Suite 101, Dover, Ohio) last fall. The shop is staffed solely by volunteers and inventoried by donations alone.   Also, after having agreed to take over the production of Tuscarawas County’s traditional Christmas Tour of Homes from the Dennison Depot Railroad Museum in 2009, our members followed through and did an even better job the second time around. 

   In 2011 we look forward to offering our 2nd preservation and restoration workshop in April (THAT Old House), our first-ever plant sale in May, our 3rd Annual Christmas Tour of Homes and, of course, continuing to develop Olde House Parts.”

CarlMackey-HHAMOTY2010 George Laurence presented the Association’s Member of the Year award to Carl Mackey (pictured L-R: Carl Mackey, Laurence) for not only coming up with the idea for Olde House Parts, the architectural salvage shop, but for his contribution of time, talent, energy, and materials in making the shop a reality.

 

RobinMackey-HHAMOTY2010    Patti Strickling presented a second Member of the Year award – to Robin Mackey (pictured L-R: Patti Strickling, Robin Mackey) – for her tireless efforts as co-chair of the organization’s Christmas Tour of Homes. 

 

   Said Strickling, “Robin’s commitment and determination to get things done the way we needed them done and when we needed them done is an irreplaceable asset.  I don’t know what we’d do without her.”

 

    The Heritage Home Association of Tuscarawas County is dedicated to the preservation of architecturally and historically significant homes and buildings located in Tuscarawas County.  It is the aim of the Association to develop and encourage interest within the community in restoring and preserving these historic structures, cultivate appreciation of this part of our local heritage, and to educate individuals interested in preservation and restoration of local homes and other buildings.

 

   Since its inception in the year 1976, sixty-three of Tuscarawas County’s historic homes and buildings have been awarded Heritage Home Plaques, 20th Century Plaques, or Historic Markers by TuscHHA, including the county courthouse in New Philadelphia and Dover’s historic Reeves Victorian Mansion.  The Association is tax exempt under IRC Section 501(c)(3). 

 

   For more information, send a message via email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

O’Donnell House Awarded Heritage Home Plaque 11/22/2010

439EHighAve-NewPhila20101120

 

Photo by Jerry Stoughton

A New Philadelphia house built circa 1868 by Stephan and Amelia O’Donnell has been unanimously recommended for approval of a Heritage Home Plaque by the plaquing committee of the Heritage Home Association of Tuscarawas County.

The brick Italianate dwelling is home to Darrell Priddy and Pat Russell.

The original owner, Mr. O'Donnell, was president of the Citizens National Bank from 1882-1902.  The house was later sold by the O’Donnells to James & Anna Congleton who lived there for over 40 years.  Mr. Congleton was the proprietor of the Delphian Hotel and a broom manufacturer.

The 4000 square-foot house had been converted into three apartments, but was restored to its original splendor by the Priddys.  The home has 12 rooms with 11-foot ceilings, a wide foyer with open walnut stairway, 5 fireplaces, and leaded glass windows.

It is the 44th home to be approved by the committee for receipt of a Heritage Home plaque and will be featured on the Christmas Tour of Homes slated for Sunday, December 12th from noon to 5PM.

To date, 64 Tuscarawas County historic homes and buildings have been awarded Heritage Home Plaques, 20th Century Plaques, or Historic Markers by Tusc HHA, including the county courthouse in New Philadelphia and Dover’s historic Reeves Victorian Mansion.

The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association is dedicated to the preservation of architecturally and historically significant homes and buildings located in Tuscarawas County.  It is the aim of the Association to develop and encourage interest within the community in restoring and preserving these historic structures, cultivate appreciation of this part of our local heritage, and to educate individuals interested in preservation and restoration of local homes and other buildings. The organization is tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

The State of Ohio has bragging rights to the largest number of properties and districts, more than 3700, of any state in the union listed in the National Register of Historic Places.  There are listings in every one of Ohio’s 88 counties.  69 are National Historic Landmarks.  24 of those listed are located in Tuscarawas County.

For more information on the Christmas Tour of Homes e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

September 11, 2010
Richard Burrell House Celebrates #180
2740NWoosterDover
The home of members Jeff and Susan Miller is celebrating its 180th birthday this year!  Known as the Richard Burrell House, it is located at 2740 N. Wooster Avenue in Dover.

Once part of a 158-acre farm, the 12-room brick house is of the Greek Revival style.  Three generations of one family owned and occupied this house for 63 years.  The Millers are the 7th family to own the home.

Jerry Stoughton, VP of Plaquing and past president of Tusc HHA, said the house might have originally been built as a wedding gift by Burrell for his son and daughter-in-law when they married in 1830.

The house was awarded a Heritage Home Plaque by The Heritage Home Association of Tuscarawas County on August 10, 2008.
April 1, 2010
If you build it, they...
Our April meeting for members was a casual affair hosted by our newest TuscHHA members Doug McGlumphy and Jennifer Greer at their historic Hisrich Hills House Bed & Breakfast and Art Farm on Stucky Valley Road in Stone Creek.
HisrichHillsHouseBB
The "meeting" consisted of touring the House, grounds, and other buildings, along with some great food and conversation.  Daffodils everywhere!
 
The house was originally built in 1820 and its addition in around 1840.  It was moved to its present location from Coshocton County.
 
The B&B recreates a pioneer days atmosphere with authentic period furnishings and a romantic cooking fireplace.  The adaptive use of the timber frame addition combines historic and contemporary aethstetics with modern conveniences.
 
If you're looking for private tranquility, peace, and quiet, this might just be your getaway! Visit the link above for more information.
DougMcGlumphy-HirichHillsQA
 
The buildings are situated on a hillside, overlooking a ball field, and Doug informed me there used to be a corn field...  Hmmm.  Field of Dreams?
 
After we milled about the buildings and grounds, we gathered 'round the fire circle for a Q&A with co-owner Doug McGlumphy, then adjourned, as we always do, for hors d'oevres and desserts.
 
Make time to join us for our members' meetings.  There's never nothin' going on!
Perfect Landing at Country Manor
23 members and friends of The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association enjoyed dinner together at The Perfect Landing Restaurant at Harry Cleaver Airport inMarchBirthdayatPerfectLanding New Philadelphia on Friday.
The fish was great, as was the coleslaw, and dessert was a birthday cake in celebration of the birthdays of Patti Strickling, Jerry Stoughton, and Susan Miller.
After dinner, we were treated to a tour of  Country Manor, known better as the "county home."
CountryManorTour1
The place is huge.  It was built in the 1800's, the original building being known as the County Infirmary.
The second floor was divided into a pink wing for the ladies and blue for the gentlemen.
It's for sale.  Anybody want to buy an institutional grade building?
Thanks, Kas, for arranging the evening for us!
 
As you can see below, more than the 23 who came for dinner joined us for the tour.

TCHHATourGroupMAR2010

The Annual Meeting:

Directors Elected, MOTY Named

Members of The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association elected nine directors for 2010 at their Annual Meeting held on Thursday, January 7, 2010 at the Reeves Carriage House in Dover.

Elected were Rod Kirkendall (president), Tom Strickling (vice-president), Leslie Wilson (secretary), Liz Hipp (treasurer), Patti Strickling (public relations), Jerry Stoughton (plaquing), Marlena Allen (programs), Tod Carper (membership), and George Laurence (projects).

In recapping the Association’s year, Kirkendall said, “Wow! What a year! It was eventful and very productive in terms of furthering our mission as an organization.  We presented a record 8 plaques (Historic Markers, Heritage Home and 20th Century Home plaques) for deserving structures in our county, including our first historic barn and the Ragersville Schoolhouse. We presented our first-ever (and the first-ever in Tuscarawas County) preservation and restoration workshop. After agreeing to take over the running of the traditional Christmas Tour of Homes from the Dennison Depot Railroad Museum, our members followed through and did a great job.  It was a natural for us.  Also during 2009, we achieved a new high water mark in terms of membership, and we were granted federal tax-exempt status by IRS.”

Liz Hipp and George Laurence, both of New Philadelphia (pictured L-R: Laurence, 2008 member of the year PattiHHAMemberoftheYear2009-Compressed Strickling, president Rod Kirkendall, and Liz Hipp – photo by Edee Kirkendall), were named co-members of the year for their leadership and hard work in the production of THAT Old House, the preservation and restoration workshop for do-it-yourselfers, which was held at the Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts in August.  It was a first for the organization and a first for Tuscarwas County.  Laurence said, “We’re looking forward to doing it again in the Spring of 2011.”

As for the Christmas Tour of Homes, its 2009 committee chairpersons are open to turning the helm over to some fresh young talent.  Come on down!

After dispensing with the evening's business, members and guests enjoyed hors d'oeuvres, desserts, each other's company and stimulating conversation.

Strickling-Schreiner-Stoughton20090107We were fortunate to enjoy the company of Gail and Bernie Schreiner, guests of founder Ernestine Kehl.  Here they are, pictured with VP Tom Strickling (left) and Plaquing Chairman Jerry Stoughton (right).

The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association is dedicated to the preservation of architecturally and historically significant homes and buildings located in Tuscarawas County.  It is the aim of the Association to develop and encourage interest within the community in restoring and preserving these historic structures, cultivate appreciation of this part of our local heritage, and to educate individuals interested in preservation and restoration of local homes and other buildings.

To date, 62 Tuscarawas County historic homes and buildings have been awarded Heritage Home Plaques, 20th Century Plaques, or Historic Markers by Tusc HHA, including the county courthouse in New Philadelphia and Dover’s historic Reeves Victorian Mansion.

December 3, 2009

PARK AVENUE HOUSE AWARDED 20th CENTURY PLAQUE

 

432ParkAve-BolivarOH-WEB Patrick & Michelle Crowe were presented a 20th Century Plaque by members of The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association for their residence at 432 Park Avenue in Bolivar.  The Crowes are the sixth family to reside in the home.

The 10-room brick Colonial Revival house was built between 1903 and 1906 for Earl D. Fisher, a life-long resident of Bolivar who operated an orchard farm begun by his grandfather in 1847.  Fisher served as a Bolivar Village councilman and also served on the School Board.

The house features curved windows in the parlor, oak woodwork and floors, four sets of pocket doors, and two staircases.  One-inch oak planks sheath the exterior of the structure under the golden salt-glazed brick, which was fired by the Federal Clay Product Company of Mineral City.  Considered modern for its time, it was built with indoor plumbing.

The original house plans by Charles B. Hickman of Massillon have been handed down by each owner.  The plans were copied from a house that formerly stood in Wooster, Ohio.

The Association’s criteria for determining worthiness for a 20th Century Plaque are essentially the same as those for a Heritage Home, except that it is awarded for architecturally or historically significant homes or other structures built between 1901 and 1925.

To begin to qualify for a 20th Century Plaque, Heritage Home Plaque, or a Historic Marker, the property owner must first submit an application to the Association.

The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association is a non-profit Ohio corporation, tax-exempt under IRC section 501(c)(3) . The association is dedicated to the documentation and preservation of architecturally and historically significant homes and buildings located in Tuscarawas County.  To date, 61 Tuscarawas County historic homes and buildings have been awarded Heritage Home Plaques, 20th Century Plaques, or Historic Markers by Tusc HHA, including the Tuscarawas County courthouse and historic Reeves Victorian Mansion.

The State of Ohio has bragging rights to the largest number of properties and districts, more than 3700, of any state in the union listed in the National Register of Historic Places.  69 are National Historic Landmarks. There are listings in every one of Ohio’s 88 counties.  24 are located in Tuscarawas County.

December 1, 2009

FRY'S VALLEY BARN AWARDED HISTORIC MARKER

 

SaundersBarn-1WEBMembers of The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association approved the presentation of a Historic Marker for the barn owned by Kerry & Pam Saunders at 1188 Fry’s Valley Road between Tuscarawas and Gnadenhutten, Ohio.

A Historic Marker is awarded for a home or building that has historical significance -- such as a notable person having conducted business there  -- without the property having to qualify as a Heritage Home.  To begin to qualify for a Historic Marker,  20th Century Plaque, or Heritage Home Plaque, the property owner must first submit an application to the Association.

This, the first barn to be awarded a plaque by the Association, was built in Fry's Valley in 1884 by Frederick J. Haupert on 100 acres he purchased in 1855.  The 100 acres was originally patented to Nathan B. Haswell in 1833 by President Andrew Jackson.

The structure is a poplar-sided Sweitzer Forebay barn, a 2 1/2 story bank barn characterized by a cantilevered overhang on the second story.  This style was popularized by the German/Swiss immigrants in Pennsylvania.  The barn has its original slate roof and its cornerstone (pictured), with Mr. Haupert's name and the date 1884, is intact.SaundersBarn-2WEB-NOV09

The Kinsey family owned the barn from 1931-2001.  The Saunders’ are the 3rd family to own the barn.

The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association is a non-profit Ohio corporation, tax-exempt under IRC section 501(c)(3). The association is dedicated to the documentation and preservation of architecturally and historically significant homes and other structures located in Tuscarawas County.   More than 60 Tuscarawas County historic homes and buildings have been awarded Historic Markers, Heritage Home Plaques, or 20th Century Plaques by the Association.

The State of Ohio has bragging rights to the largest number of properties and districts, more than 3700, of any state in the union listed in the National Register of Historic Places.  69 are National Historic Landmarks. There are listings in every one of Ohio’s 88 counties.  24 are located in Tuscarawas County.

Hipp_Plaque_Presentation2-NOV2009

11/22/2009

HIPP HOUSE IS A HERITAGE HOME

Members of The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association voted unanimously to award a Heritage Home Plaque for the residence of David and Elizabeth Hipp on East High Avenue in New Philadelphia.

Liz & Dave purchased the house in November of 1998, and have been working hard to restore it ever since.  The Hipps are the 3rd owner of the house since it was built in 1874 by Benjamin P. Scott for his second wife, Emma, who he married in 1873.

Mr. Scott, a native of Washington Co., PA, came to New Philadelphia in 1868, where he first engaged in the hardware business and managed the sale of all salt made in the county.  Later he was associated with the Citizen's National Bank, located on the NW corner of the square in New Philadelphia.  He served as Vice President, Cashier, and in 1901 as President.  He died in 1915.

The 8-room brick Second Empire home boasts 12-foot ceilings on the first floor, 8½-inch molding surrounding the first floor doorways, 12-inch baseboards, and 4 fireplaces.   A curved walnut staircase is the focal point of the foyer; arched double pocket doors separate the front parlor from the dining room, and there are some interior shutters.  The front porch and porte-cochère, though not original, were added before 1900.

Says Liz, “We reflect back on all the situations we faced, and we can be very thankful we had the privilege to have worked with so many knowledgeable individuals.  Most of all we have had the support and encouragement from our friends of The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association.  Many of our TCHHA friends have been with us from the beginning and have seen the transformation this house has gone through.  Without them I'm not sure we would have been able to keep up the motivation to complete the house.  It's not quite done, but we have gotten through the better part of the work and lived to tell the story.”

The State of Ohio has bragging rights to the largest number of properties of any state in the union listed in the National Register of Historic Places. 23 of those properties are located in Tuscarawas County, and many more have yet to be officially recognized.

The Tuscarawas County Heritage Home Association is a non-profit Ohio corporation, tax-exempt under IRC section 501(c)(3). The Association is dedicated to the documentation and preservation of architecturally and historically significant homes and buildings located in Tuscarawas County.  To date, 61 Tuscarawas County historic homes and buildings have been awarded Heritage Home Plaques, 20th Century Plaques, or Historic Markers by Tusc HHA, including the Tuscarawas County courthouse in New Philadelphia and Dover’s historic Reeves Victorian Mansion.